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Kamala Harris’ stepdaughter Ella Emhoff peddles $5K textiles at NYC cannabis shop

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Look out, Hunter Biden — there’s another White House-connected artist hitting New York’s art scene.

Vice President Kamala Harris’ stepdaughter opened her textile exhibition Thursday at a cannabis store on the Lower East Side — where she peddled knit portraits for several thousand dollars.

Ella Emhoff — whose father is second gentleman Doug Emhoff — debuted her knit pieces, which she said marks her transition out of the fashion world and into her new phase of life as an artist.

“This new art form kind of was birthed out of my knitwear, where I started kind of playing around with this duplicate stitch technique,” Emhoff, 24, told The Post during her reception at Gotham NYC, billed as a “woman-owned legal cannabis concept store on the Bowery.”

Ella Emhoff, Kamala Harris’ stepdaughter, celebrated the opening night of her textile gallery at a Lower East Side cannabis shop. William Lopez/ NY Post

“But I found that no one really wanted to wear all of this stuff, because it’s kind of crazy and loud, but they liked looking at it. So then I just started experimenting. And now I’m here.”

Fourteen of the first stepdaughter’s textile pieces were on display among the shop’s various marijuana accessories, the proceeds of which would go directly into her own pocket, she said.

Emhoff declined to address rumors the exhibition was a fundraiser for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency, a controversial anti-Israel organization which she caught fire for publicly supporting just last month.

Each piece was modeled after items, people and pets that Emhoff said “just kind of makes you smile.”

“Because these are all just objects [in the art] that I like, and I like looking at, but they obviously evoke some kind of happy emotion from people, because it’s a recognizable object in yarn,” she added.

A close-up of Emhoff’s bright red nose and freckly forehead had a striking $5,500 price tag attached. William Lopez/ NY Post

“I’m testing the waters, because obviously, I know it takes a lot of effort and time and just like putting yourself out there. But you know, it’s been fun so far.”

Lockets, flowers, a puppy and a purse with a cookie emblem were among the textiles, as well as a portrait of a perplexed-looking woman named Bailey.

Emhoff’s two self-portraits were among the most popular with the crowd — and the most expensive.

A close-up of Emhoff’s bright red nose and freckly forehead had a striking $5,500 price tag attached.

Each of the pieces was modeled after items, people and pets that Emhoff said “just kind of makes you smile.” William Lopez/ NY Post

Harris’ stepdaughter was also asking for $4,500 for a textile of two heart-shaped Gucci hairclips — a 1,400% markup from the designer accessories after which they were modeled.

“Fiber art is having a massive resurgence right now, with lots of museum and gallery shows,” said opening night attendee Heike, 44, adding that she “works in art.”

“I pretty much follow everyone who is relevant in art these days. I happened to be in New York today,” she continued, later saying that while she liked Emhoff’s work, it wasn’t really her style.

The event was attended by nearly 400 people, many of whom identified themselves as knitting hobbyists — and about half of whom were described as “queer” by one viewer.

Emhoff obtained a fine arts degree that concentrated in apparel and textiles from Parsons School of Design in 2021. Instagram / Gotham.NY

“Her art is f–king amazing … her stuff is gorgeous. I don’t even know how she began to do this stuff. It’s crazy,” said Michelle, 24, a vegan chef. “The different colors and the depths, it’s so insane.”

Jack, a 20-year-old New York University student, told The Post he admired how Emhoff used yarns of different weights and gauge to achieve dimensionality, while sustainable ready-to-wear brand founder Cameron applauded her creativity.

“It’s not trying to be anything. It really is to like her like, ‘Oh, I’m gonna make this, this looks really fun,’” said Cameron, 24.

Emhoff said her mother, Kerstin Emhoff, the CEO of the commercial production company Prettybird, first taught her how to knit at just 6 years old during a Disney vacation.

The event was attended by nearly 400 people, many of whom identified themselves as knitting hobbyists — and about half of whom were described as “queer” by one viewer. William Lopez/ NY Post

She later pursued a fine arts degree that concentrated in apparel and textiles while at Parsons School of Design, but let her projects fall to the wayside while she pursued modeling and a career in fashion.

Despite moving away from her wearable art, Emhoff’s knitted clothing was also for sale at the show, including drawstring pants for $350, a knitted high-neck tank top for $150 and knitted biker shorts for $750.

A handful of attendees told The Post that they supported Emhoff’s decision to post a link to UNRWA’s English-language fundraising page last month, and only removed it after a Post inquiry to the White House.

The United States cut funding to the group over its members’ alleged participation in the Oct. 7 terrorist attack in Israel.

Though Doug Emhoff is Jewish, his daughter has pointedly distanced herself from the faith.

“I’m Jewish, and I’m an anti-Zionist Jewish person. I’ve been to Israel. I’ve been to Palestine. I’ve seen with my own eyes what happens there, so I hope for Palestinian freedom,” fellow artist Kate Huh, 60, told The Post Thursday.

Musician and television host China Black, 47, agreed, stating that they “don’t support things like whatever is happening to the people.”

“I’m not with no negativity. I’m not with the war. I’m against killing people. I’m about unity. So yeah, I don’t like stuff like that,” Black said.

Emhoff caught heat last month for publicly supporting a fundraiser for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency, a controversial anti-Israel organization. X @VP

Several attendees declined to comment on Emhoff’s UNRWA support, with some claiming they weren’t aware of the controversy.

Emhoff’s appeal comes just months after The Post revealed she was raising money for Gaza through the Palestinian Children’s Relief Fund.

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